GuinnessLove

You're a catalyst to your own happiness

asapscience:

ohscience:

I’m an artist with a molecular biology degree from the University of Washington, and I’ve been working on making science infographics for several months now. 
This week I made an animated identification chart of North American butterflies. You can check out the full sized GIF here or pick up a poster for your room here :)

This rules! 

asapscience:

ohscience:

I’m an artist with a molecular biology degree from the University of Washington, and I’ve been working on making science infographics for several months now. 

This week I made an animated identification chart of North American butterflies. You can check out the full sized GIF here or pick up a poster for your room here :)

This rules! 

coveredinsnow-:

ilovemaydayparade69:

rubee:

"why dont you just give him a chance"

idk because im not physically or mentally attracted to him and ‘but he likes you’ or ‘but hes really nice’ isnt going to change the fact that im not interested

Damn, I don’t think women know how much that really hurts

image

(via ruinedchildhood)

skunkbear:

Math Is Pretty

Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates 3D fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.

Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”

Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.

(via accidentalscience)